890s How Amazon Is Trying To Stop Package Theft images and subtitles

Every day, 1.7million packages are stolen or go missing off doorsteps across thecountry. This is higher than it's ever been before and it's costing Amazonand other sellers millions.Expansion of online retail has resulted in expansion in the crime ofpackage theft, which brings you to something around $9 billion a year instolen packages. Now creative solutions are popping up everywhere, fromdoorbell cameras to automatic locks, porch lockers to alternative pickuppoints. Big and small companies and everyday people are trying to stop thethieves. This is a custom built bait package that is recording him on fourdifferent cameras and it's about to unleash a pound of the world's finestglitter along with some other surprises.We wanted to find out who's losing the most when a package goes missingand what are Amazon and other companies doing to fight back?A 2019 survey conducted by insuranceQuotes.comfound that nearly one in five Americans report having a package stolen.And according to a new study by C+R research, each stolen item costs anaverage of $109 to replace, a cost typically passed down to the sellerwho's responsible for the refund or replacement.A lion's share of the loss is being absorbed by the entity doing thegreatest amount of selling, which in this case is Amazon.Amazon Prime members say they receive on average 51 packages at home everyyear, and all respondents spent an average of $222 a month on onlineorders. However, 42% of customers say they avoid buying expensive itemsonline because of theft, meaning Amazon is missing out on even more salesrevenue. In total, the thefts add up to more than $25 million in lostgoods and services each day.There are stories and anecdotes out there about more organized thievesactually following trucks and picking packages up off of porches.But the majority of package theft occurs from someone walking down thestreet, seeing an opportunity and grabbing it.Wakefield Research conducted a study on package theft in 2018 that wassponsored by Comcast, which owns CNBC.In urban areas, you see as much as 35 % of adults saying that they'vepersonally had a package stolen.In a suburban area, that figure is 20 % and in rural areas it's 13 %.SafeWise also conducted a study.It found the places with the highest rates of package theft are the BayArea, Salt Lake City and Portland.Between like 10 and three is going to be the busiest time and it's usuallya time when people are at work or at school or out running errands.The nicer neighborhoods get packages stolen far more than what you wouldthink are the rougher sides of town.And I think because they're going after the better booty.So what happens when a package is stolen?According to C+R Research, victims will alert more than one entity.83 % contact Amazon or the seller, 60 % contact the delivery service, 48 %checked with neighbors and only 13 % called the police.So who is it that's financially responsible for the loss?Your major sellers, your Amazon, eBay, are replacing stolen goods.The shippers themselves largely aren't incurring this cost.Now some like FedEx will offer $100 worth of default liability.You can purchase more.U.S. Postal Service offers zero liability but you can, of course, purchasemore insurance. But on the whole that $9 billion is being absorbed by thesellers. Even though it may seem like Amazon replaces your itemimmediately after a theft, if that item is sold by a third party, that'swho pays for the replacement or refund.You can also contact the carrier, the shipper, but they are going to tryto get recourse again from the seller.But your best chance is to go to where you bought it from and see ifthey'll send you out another one.It's up to the discretion of the seller whether they want to replace youritem. At the end of the day, it's the consumer who pays for this becausethink about it, the rates have to go up.You can't afford to keep having this type of loss.Although many police departments don't track package theft specifically,the numbers are definitely up.Denver, for example, saw a 68 % increase in package theft from 2015 to2018. Because small retailers and huge sellers like Amazon are spendingmore on refunds and replacements every year, they've got a big incentiveto stop the crimes. One solution the e-commerce giant offers is anautomatic front door lock system called Amazon Key, available in 50 citiesfor free with compatible smart lock kits.It lets users unlock the front door remotely, allowing a delivery personentry into the home. Amazon Key can also open certain garages andcompatible cars, allowing packages to be left in a trunk, for example.And building managers can use Amazon Key for Business, giving deliverydrivers a smart fob with time limited access to drop off packages insidean apartment complex. However, C+R Research shows that only 4 % of packagethat victims use Amazon Key.That number may be low for one reason.Even though you can literally watch it in real time, the idea of unlockingyour door for a stranger while you're not there so they can go in to yourhome I think strikes some people as disquieting.And then there's Amazon lockers.Packages are left inside these automatic electronic lockers for pickup atconvenience stores, grocery stores, apartment buildings, malls and otherlocations in more than 900 U.S.cities. Locker+ locations, often on college campuses, are staffed and canhold packages for up to 15 days.Amazon also offers pickup in-store at certain retailers such as Rite Aid,GNC, Health Mart and Stage Stores.We have 11 % who said that they're sending their deliveries to an Amazonlocker or similar type of service.And then we have 10 % who said that they use some sort of package lockbox.These individual lockboxes like these from Kingsley Park are often securedto a porch where carriers enter an access code to leave packages.And then finally, we have 18 % of respondents said that they wind upsending their deliveries to their work address.Amazon says the vast majority of deliveries make it to customers withoutan issue and that its customer service is available 24/7.Amazon Map Tracking also allows customers to view the progress of theirdelivery in real time when a driver is close.And for packages delivered by Amazon it offers a photo on delivery.Of course not all online shopping happens on Amazon.So there's also a variety of smaller companies offering electronic smartlockers. It's really tough to put a canoe into our lockers or a mattress,but other than that, we put tires all the time, we take some pretty bigitems through the lockers.Parcel Pending has 4,000 locker locations at retail and grocery stores,companies and apartment complexes in 48 states and Canada.We've been working with one e-tailer who ships over 300 million packagesand they have talked about tens of millions of dollars of loss inpackages. And so to put in a solution like an electronic locker system,for them it's almost a drop in the bucket because the loss in packages isnot an insurable event for them.So it's coming out of their pocket.When lockers aren't an option, consumers often turn to more homegrownsolutions.About a third of consumers will actually have a package delivered to afriend or have a friend or neighbor or family member pick up the package.Some things are more extreme.We actually found one in five have taken a sick day or called in a PTO orvacation day to their employer so that they could be home specifically toreceive a package that they were afraid might be stolen.The carriers themselves now offer a solution too: skip porch deliveriesaltogether by picking up your package at a storefront.We've got between the UPS Stores and then we announced a partnership withCVS, Michaels, Advance Auto to add a third one in there, where receiverscan say, okay, I want my packages delivered in those stores as opposed totheir home. UPS says it delivers around 20 million packages every day andthat 63 million customers have signed up for its My Choice program.Customers can schedule deliveries, reroute packages or set their defaultpackage delivery location to one of 40,000 secure access points around theworld. In the next year or so, 90 to 95 % of the U.S.coverage will be within five miles of a UPS access point.FedEx, which says it delivers 15 million packages a day, has a similarprogram called Delivery Manager.It lets customers enter specific instructions for where and how couriersshould make a delivery or lets you reroute a package for pickup at one of14,000 retail locations like FedEx Office stores, Walgreens, Krogers andAlbertsons. By 2026 we expect the growth to be roughly 100 millionpackages a day.So we're going to have to have plans in place to make sure that therearen't packages laying out on people's front porches for hours or in somecases days if they're not home.And USPS offers a service called Informed Delivery, which it says has morethan 21 million subscribers.It offers a snapshot of every day's expected deliveries and allowssubscribers to opt for a package to be held at a post office instead ofbeing left at the front door.FedEx, UPS, USPS and other carriers also offer package tracking.And although you can file a claim for missing packages if they wereinsured through the carrier, it's typically not the carrier'sresponsibility once it's arrived.Once a package is delivered, it's out of our custodial control.And so it's really up to law enforcement to work directly with consumerson any reported theft.There's a handful of outside companies like TrackerSense and Logistimaticsthat make one time GPS trackers for packages.And then there's startups trying to streamline the entire trackingprocess. LA-based Route recently launched its app to offer one-stop-shoptracking for consumers.So you open up our app and you see everything that you've ordered fromevery merchant in a single map interface.Route says its algorithms can detect if a package is wrongfully reportedas stolen, helping reduce loss for its 1,800 merchant partners.And for a fee of 1 % of the item's value, Route will also cover the costif a package is stolen. Once the carrier usually drops the package off ona porch, their job of delivering that is done and a lot of times that'swhy they're taking pictures now to show, you know, the proof that thepackage was actually delivered.We're pretty alone on an island in covering porch pirating.Doorbell cameras are now a common way that consumers try to protect theirpackages once they're no longer the carrier's responsibility.C+R Research found that 25 % of package theft victims install doorbellcameras like the systems made by Boston-based SimpliSafe.It's making sure that we have that reliable, high quality video footagewhere you're going to capture the face of the person on it so that ifsomebody does steal a package, we can follow up on that.But doorbell cameras don't only capture those with bad intentions.Their American flag that they had outside their front door had fallen downand the moment captured on video was a neighbor walking by, seeing that,righting the flag and saluting to the flag before moving on.If a crime is underway, SimpliSafe now offers realtime monitoring of videofootage when an alarm is triggered and can dispatch police to the home.They will know that this is not a false alarm, it's not a waste of time.This is a really valuable use of their time to catch a crime in action.And there's a lot of controversy.Some people feel like, you know, it's giving a lot of access to BigBrother. But I think we all want Big Brother helping us when it's helpingus recover from a crime.SimpliSafe's video doorbell costs $169 and it offers a smart lock startingat $99. Competitor Ring starts at $99.99.And Google's Nest Hello video doorbell starts at $229.The problem with that is you get a picture of the bad guy and you see thebad guy walk away with the package.But what are you going to do with the bad guy?Who's going to go after him and is anything really going to happen?And are you going to catch the guy who took your item?Typically not.Hey, put that down.Screenshots of package thieves from these doorbell cameras often end upposted online in forums like Nextdoor in hopes the community willrecognize and stop the thieves.More and more, neighbors are taking matters into their own hands frombaiting thieves with garbage-filled packages, boxes rigged to explode withblank shotgun shells, or the infamous glitter bomb packages planted by aformer NASA engineer.We would want to encourage people not to take the law into their own handsand to go through the proper process of alerting police and not try to setanything up that could be potentially dangerous.Carriers and law enforcement recommend filing a police report when apackage theft occurs. When you see the same body type and disguisehappening repeatedly in a neighborhood and you're keeping that footage andyou're sharing it with local law enforcement, there's a much better chancethat you are going to catch someone.Still, even with a police report, the chances of catching them are slim.It's actually really quite difficult to find people who are doing this,really unless you're caught in the act.The Denver Police Department, one of the few that tracks package theft,says it arrested 7 % of package thieves in 2018.The U.S. Postal Inspection Service is your best bet.However, they were able to make arrests of less than 1 % of the number ofpackages that are being stolen per year.And that's just arrests. It's not convictions and it's not necessarilyfinding any of the lost loot.USPS says postal inspectors arrested almost 2,500 suspects for theft ofmail and packages in 2018.The average value of a stolen package is far below what would constitute afelony. In California, for example, the item needs to be worth more than$950. But in South Carolina, a proposed Defense Against Porch Pirates Actwould make it a felony. And in Texas, lawmakers recently passed a billthat would fine package thieves between $4,000 and $10,000 with a possiblejail sentence between six months and 10 years.And some police departments have experimented with beating thieves withpackages and staking out doorsteps.The reality is, as Amazon continues to bring more shoppers online, thereare simply more opportunities for these easy, simple thefts.I think it's our job to continue innovating because there will becontinued innovation on the criminal side as well.Amazon and other sellers are highly motivated to stop the huge lossesincurred by package theft, which means the solutions are constantlyimproving from doorbell cameras, tracking and secure locations for packagedelivery. There will come a time when we look back at the way we handlede-commerce deliveries, and I think it'll probably seem fairly primitivethat you just have these cardboard boxes sitting on porches.Whether it's things like the Amazon Key or lockboxes, technologicalinnovation is so robust right now and especially if you combine that withan opportunity for individual entrepreneurs to make money from solvingthis problem, I really think that it will be figured out to some extent.I actually think it's probably gotten a little tougher for criminals tosteal something because there's more attention paid to this, consumerawareness on it is growing, which our data reflects.But you're starting from a pretty easy position.This is not a difficult crime to commit.

How Amazon Is Trying To Stop Package Theft

Package theft is at an all-time high, with 1.7 million packages stolen or lost every day in the U.S. As Amazon drives more shopping online, Prime members say they receive on average 51 packages a year, and one in three Americans report having at least one package stolen, resulting in $25 million of lost goods and services every day. In response, Amazon has installed secure locker locations in 900 U.S. cities and now offers Amazon Key, which allows customers to give remote access to delivery drivers so they can leave packages inside the home, garage or car trunk. UPS, FedEx and the U.S. Postal Service also offer a growing number of storefronts where packages can be picked up. Other solutions include video doorbells by companies like Google, start-ups experimenting with advanced package tracking, and lockboxes for individual homes. » Subscribe to CNBC: cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC TV: cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision » Subscribe to CNBC Classic: cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCclassic About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC How Amazon Is Trying To Stop Package Theft
amazon, stock market, us news, breaking news, package theft prevention, financial news, package theft prank, does amazon deliver on saturday, cable, news, news station, business, does amazon deliver on sunday, amazon theft, world news, CNBC, news channel, stocks, Package Thief vs. Glitter Bomb Trap, cable news, money, finance stock, Stock market news, finance news, money tips, mark rober,
< ?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?><>

< start="0.99" dur="1.47">Every day, 1.7>

< start="2.46" dur="3.21">million packages are stolen or go missing off doorsteps across the>

< start="5.67" dur="4.02">country. This is higher than it's ever been before and it's costing Amazon>

< start="9.69" dur="1.38">and other sellers millions.>

< start="11.31" dur="5.22">Expansion of online retail has resulted in expansion in the crime of>

< start="16.53" dur="5.31">package theft, which brings you to something around $9 billion a year in>

< start="21.84" dur="4.2">stolen packages. Now creative solutions are popping up everywhere, from>

< start="26.04" dur="3.78">doorbell cameras to automatic locks, porch lockers to alternative pickup>

< start="29.82" dur="3.75">points. Big and small companies and everyday people are trying to stop the>

< start="33.57" dur="3.6">thieves. This is a custom built bait package that is recording him on four>

< start="37.17" dur="3.03">different cameras and it's about to unleash a pound of the world's finest>

< start="40.2" dur="1.89">glitter along with some other surprises.>

< start="43.05" dur="3.27">We wanted to find out who's losing the most when a package goes missing>

< start="46.47" dur="2.73">and what are Amazon and other companies doing to fight back?>

< start="52.92" dur="2.9">A 2019 survey conducted by insuranceQuotes.com>

< start="55.82" dur="3.57">found that nearly one in five Americans report having a package stolen.>

< start="59.9" dur="3.72">And according to a new study by C+R research, each stolen item costs an>

< start="63.68" dur="4.44">average of $109 to replace, a cost typically passed down to the seller>

< start="68.18" dur="2.1">who's responsible for the refund or replacement.>

< start="70.79" dur="4.32">A lion's share of the loss is being absorbed by the entity doing the>

< start="75.11" dur="3.09">greatest amount of selling, which in this case is Amazon.>

< start="78.71" dur="3.87">Amazon Prime members say they receive on average 51 packages at home every>

< start="82.58" dur="4.65">year, and all respondents spent an average of $222 a month on online>

< start="87.23" dur="4.5">orders. However, 42% of customers say they avoid buying expensive items>

< start="91.73" dur="3.87">online because of theft, meaning Amazon is missing out on even more sales>

< start="95.6" dur="4.2">revenue. In total, the thefts add up to more than $25 million in lost>

< start="99.8" dur="1.41">goods and services each day.>

< start="101.45" dur="3.81">There are stories and anecdotes out there about more organized thieves>

< start="105.26" dur="3.03">actually following trucks and picking packages up off of porches.>

< start="108.56" dur="3.36">But the majority of package theft occurs from someone walking down the>

< start="111.92" dur="1.86">street, seeing an opportunity and grabbing it.>

< start="114.05" dur="3.3">Wakefield Research conducted a study on package theft in 2018 that was>

< start="117.35" dur="2.28">sponsored by Comcast, which owns CNBC.>

< start="119.63" dur="6.13">In urban areas, you see as much as 35 % of adults saying that they've>

< start="125.78" dur="1.77">personally had a package stolen.>

< start="127.85" dur="5.7">In a suburban area, that figure is 20 % and in rural areas it's 13 %.>

< start="134.03" dur="1.68">SafeWise also conducted a study.>

< start="136.1" dur="3">It found the places with the highest rates of package theft are the Bay>

< start="139.1" dur="2.64">Area, Salt Lake City and Portland.>

< start="141.74" dur="2.76">Between like 10 and three is going to be the busiest time and it's usually>

< start="144.5" dur="2.94">a time when people are at work or at school or out running errands.>

< start="148.04" dur="4.02">The nicer neighborhoods get packages stolen far more than what you would>

< start="152.06" dur="1.47">think are the rougher sides of town.>

< start="153.83" dur="2.41">And I think because they're going after the better booty.>

< start="157.67" dur="1.74">So what happens when a package is stolen?>

< start="159.86" dur="3.74">According to C+R Research, victims will alert more than one entity.>

< start="163.6" dur="5.62">83 % contact Amazon or the seller, 60 % contact the delivery service, 48 %>

< start="169.22" dur="2.7">checked with neighbors and only 13 % called the police.>

< start="172.52" dur="2.58">So who is it that's financially responsible for the loss?>

< start="176.51" dur="6.05">Your major sellers, your Amazon, eBay, are replacing stolen goods.>

< start="182.56" dur="3.52">The shippers themselves largely aren't incurring this cost.>

< start="186.2" dur="5.07">Now some like FedEx will offer $100 worth of default liability.>

< start="191.3" dur="1.02">You can purchase more.>

< start="192.62" dur="3.72">U.S. Postal Service offers zero liability but you can, of course, purchase>

< start="196.34" dur="6.15">more insurance. But on the whole that $9 billion is being absorbed by the>

< start="202.49" dur="3.78">sellers. Even though it may seem like Amazon replaces your item>

< start="206.27" dur="3.54">immediately after a theft, if that item is sold by a third party, that's>

< start="209.81" dur="1.74">who pays for the replacement or refund.>

< start="211.85" dur="3.45">You can also contact the carrier, the shipper, but they are going to try>

< start="215.3" dur="2.7">to get recourse again from the seller.>

< start="218.12" dur="3.27">But your best chance is to go to where you bought it from and see if>

< start="221.39" dur="1.05">they'll send you out another one.>

< start="222.8" dur="2.49">It's up to the discretion of the seller whether they want to replace your>

< start="225.29" dur="3.24">item. At the end of the day, it's the consumer who pays for this because>

< start="228.53" dur="2.28">think about it, the rates have to go up.>

< start="230.84" dur="2.27">You can't afford to keep having this type of loss.>

< start="233.33" dur="2.88">Although many police departments don't track package theft specifically,>

< start="236.42" dur="1.35">the numbers are definitely up.>

< start="238.07" dur="4.23">Denver, for example, saw a 68 % increase in package theft from 2015 to>

< start="242.3" dur="3.93">2018. Because small retailers and huge sellers like Amazon are spending>

< start="246.23" dur="3.48">more on refunds and replacements every year, they've got a big incentive>

< start="249.71" dur="5.43">to stop the crimes. One solution the e-commerce giant offers is an>

< start="255.17" dur="4.2">automatic front door lock system called Amazon Key, available in 50 cities>

< start="259.37" dur="2.15">for free with compatible smart lock kits.>

< start="261.8" dur="3.09">It lets users unlock the front door remotely, allowing a delivery person>

< start="264.89" dur="3.75">entry into the home. Amazon Key can also open certain garages and>

< start="268.64" dur="3.45">compatible cars, allowing packages to be left in a trunk, for example.>

< start="272.66" dur="3.36">And building managers can use Amazon Key for Business, giving delivery>

< start="276.02" dur="3.81">drivers a smart fob with time limited access to drop off packages inside>

< start="279.83" dur="4.5">an apartment complex. However, C+R Research shows that only 4 % of package>

< start="284.33" dur="1.53">that victims use Amazon Key.>

< start="286.25" dur="1.65">That number may be low for one reason.>

< start="288.2" dur="3.6">Even though you can literally watch it in real time, the idea of unlocking>

< start="291.8" dur="2.79">your door for a stranger while you're not there so they can go in to your>

< start="294.59" dur="3.63">home I think strikes some people as disquieting.>

< start="298.67" dur="1.05">And then there's Amazon lockers.>

< start="300.26" dur="3.3">Packages are left inside these automatic electronic lockers for pickup at>

< start="303.56" dur="3.48">convenience stores, grocery stores, apartment buildings, malls and other>

< start="307.04" dur="1.89">locations in more than 900 U.S.>

< start="308.93" dur="4.77">cities. Locker+ locations, often on college campuses, are staffed and can>

< start="313.7" dur="1.77">hold packages for up to 15 days.>

< start="315.98" dur="3.57">Amazon also offers pickup in-store at certain retailers such as Rite Aid,>

< start="319.58" dur="2.16">GNC, Health Mart and Stage Stores.>

< start="322.04" dur="4.35">We have 11 % who said that they're sending their deliveries to an Amazon>

< start="326.39" dur="2.46">locker or similar type of service.>

< start="329.39" dur="5.22">And then we have 10 % who said that they use some sort of package lockbox.>

< start="334.76" dur="3.96">These individual lockboxes like these from Kingsley Park are often secured>

< start="338.72" dur="3.2">to a porch where carriers enter an access code to leave packages.>

< start="342.29" dur="5.28">And then finally, we have 18 % of respondents said that they wind up>

< start="347.57" dur="2.28">sending their deliveries to their work address.>

< start="350.12" dur="3">Amazon says the vast majority of deliveries make it to customers without>

< start="353.12" dur="3.09">an issue and that its customer service is available 24/7.>

< start="356.54" dur="3.15">Amazon Map Tracking also allows customers to view the progress of their>

< start="359.69" dur="2.01">delivery in real time when a driver is close.>

< start="362.12" dur="3.24">And for packages delivered by Amazon it offers a photo on delivery.>

< start="366.05" dur="2.4">Of course not all online shopping happens on Amazon.>

< start="368.54" dur="3.03">So there's also a variety of smaller companies offering electronic smart>

< start="371.57" dur="4.02">lockers. It's really tough to put a canoe into our lockers or a mattress,>

< start="375.98" dur="2.67">but other than that, we put tires all the time, we take some pretty big>

< start="378.65" dur="1.02">items through the lockers.>

< start="380.06" dur="3.63">Parcel Pending has 4,000 locker locations at retail and grocery stores,>

< start="383.69" dur="3.3">companies and apartment complexes in 48 states and Canada.>

< start="387.29" dur="3.9">We've been working with one e-tailer who ships over 300 million packages>

< start="391.49" dur="2.76">and they have talked about tens of millions of dollars of loss in>

< start="394.25" dur="4.04">packages. And so to put in a solution like an electronic locker system,>

< start="398.29" dur="3.49">for them it's almost a drop in the bucket because the loss in packages is>

< start="401.78" dur="1.74">not an insurable event for them.>

< start="403.82" dur="1.5">So it's coming out of their pocket.>

< start="406.32" dur="2.84">When lockers aren't an option, consumers often turn to more homegrown>

< start="409.16" dur="1.38">solutions.>

< start="410.54" dur="3.54">About a third of consumers will actually have a package delivered to a>

< start="414.08" dur="3.06">friend or have a friend or neighbor or family member pick up the package.>

< start="417.44" dur="1.44">Some things are more extreme.>

< start="419.09" dur="4.38">We actually found one in five have taken a sick day or called in a PTO or>

< start="423.47" dur="4.32">vacation day to their employer so that they could be home specifically to>

< start="427.79" dur="2.37">receive a package that they were afraid might be stolen.>

< start="430.61" dur="3.48">The carriers themselves now offer a solution too: skip porch deliveries>

< start="434.12" dur="2.16">altogether by picking up your package at a storefront.>

< start="436.82" dur="4.05">We've got between the UPS Stores and then we announced a partnership with>

< start="440.87" dur="5.07">CVS, Michaels, Advance Auto to add a third one in there, where receivers>

< start="445.94" dur="5.37">can say, okay, I want my packages delivered in those stores as opposed to>

< start="451.31" dur="3.81">their home. UPS says it delivers around 20 million packages every day and>

< start="455.12" dur="3.27">that 63 million customers have signed up for its My Choice program.>

< start="459.08" dur="3.51">Customers can schedule deliveries, reroute packages or set their default>

< start="462.59" dur="3.75">package delivery location to one of 40,000 secure access points around the>

< start="466.34" dur="6.66">world. In the next year or so, 90 to 95 % of the U.S.>

< start="473" dur="3.53">coverage will be within five miles of a UPS access point.>

< start="476.93" dur="3.45">FedEx, which says it delivers 15 million packages a day, has a similar>

< start="480.38" dur="1.47">program called Delivery Manager.>

< start="482.24" dur="3.24">It lets customers enter specific instructions for where and how couriers>

< start="485.48" dur="3.33">should make a delivery or lets you reroute a package for pickup at one of>

< start="488.81" dur="4.56">14,000 retail locations like FedEx Office stores, Walgreens, Krogers and>

< start="493.37" dur="5.61">Albertsons. By 2026 we expect the growth to be roughly 100 million>

< start="498.98" dur="1.44">packages a day.>

< start="500.72" dur="3.39">So we're going to have to have plans in place to make sure that there>

< start="504.11" dur="3.66">aren't packages laying out on people's front porches for hours or in some>

< start="507.77" dur="1.77">cases days if they're not home.>

< start="510.13" dur="3.52">And USPS offers a service called Informed Delivery, which it says has more>

< start="513.65" dur="1.62">than 21 million subscribers.>

< start="515.66" dur="3.09">It offers a snapshot of every day's expected deliveries and allows>

< start="518.75" dur="3.06">subscribers to opt for a package to be held at a post office instead of>

< start="521.81" dur="1.08">being left at the front door.>

< start="523.34" dur="4.08">FedEx, UPS, USPS and other carriers also offer package tracking.>

< start="528.23" dur="2.34">And although you can file a claim for missing packages if they were>

< start="530.57" dur="2.61">insured through the carrier, it's typically not the carrier's>

< start="533.18" dur="1.59">responsibility once it's arrived.>

< start="535.07" dur="3.18">Once a package is delivered, it's out of our custodial control.>

< start="538.25" dur="4.71">And so it's really up to law enforcement to work directly with consumers>

< start="542.99" dur="1.89">on any reported theft.>

< start="545.48" dur="3.33">There's a handful of outside companies like TrackerSense and Logistimatics>

< start="548.9" dur="2.31">that make one time GPS trackers for packages.>

< start="551.48" dur="2.46">And then there's startups trying to streamline the entire tracking>

< start="553.94" dur="4.29">process. LA-based Route recently launched its app to offer one-stop-shop>

< start="558.23" dur="1.14">tracking for consumers.>

< start="559.37" dur="2.67">So you open up our app and you see everything that you've ordered from>

< start="562.04" dur="2.34">every merchant in a single map interface.>

< start="565.07" dur="3.33">Route says its algorithms can detect if a package is wrongfully reported>

< start="568.4" dur="3.57">as stolen, helping reduce loss for its 1,800 merchant partners.>

< start="572.42" dur="3.54">And for a fee of 1 % of the item's value, Route will also cover the cost>

< start="575.96" dur="4.17">if a package is stolen. Once the carrier usually drops the package off on>

< start="580.13" dur="3.84">a porch, their job of delivering that is done and a lot of times that's>

< start="583.97" dur="3.81">why they're taking pictures now to show, you know, the proof that the>

< start="587.78" dur="1.05">package was actually delivered.>

< start="589.28" dur="2.98">We're pretty alone on an island in covering porch pirating.>

< start="592.26" dur="5.12">Doorbell cameras are now a common way that consumers try to protect their>

< start="597.38" dur="2.64">packages once they're no longer the carrier's responsibility.>

< start="601.01" dur="3.39">C+R Research found that 25 % of package theft victims install doorbell>

< start="604.4" dur="3">cameras like the systems made by Boston-based SimpliSafe.>

< start="607.58" dur="4.3">It's making sure that we have that reliable, high quality video footage>

< start="611.88" dur="4.04">where you're going to capture the face of the person on it so that if>

< start="615.92" dur="3.75">somebody does steal a package, we can follow up on that.>

< start="619.67" dur="3.63">But doorbell cameras don't only capture those with bad intentions.>

< start="623.3" dur="4.35">Their American flag that they had outside their front door had fallen down>

< start="627.65" dur="6.33">and the moment captured on video was a neighbor walking by, seeing that,>

< start="634.7" dur="2.31">righting the flag and saluting to the flag before moving on.>

< start="637.82" dur="3.75">If a crime is underway, SimpliSafe now offers realtime monitoring of video>

< start="641.57" dur="2.94">footage when an alarm is triggered and can dispatch police to the home.>

< start="644.6" dur="3">They will know that this is not a false alarm, it's not a waste of time.>

< start="647.63" dur="3.9">This is a really valuable use of their time to catch a crime in action.>

< start="652.14" dur="1.09">And there's a lot of controversy.>

< start="653.23" dur="2.53">Some people feel like, you know, it's giving a lot of access to Big>

< start="655.76" dur="3.87">Brother. But I think we all want Big Brother helping us when it's helping>

< start="659.63" dur="1.08">us recover from a crime.>

< start="661.19" dur="3.99">SimpliSafe's video doorbell costs $169 and it offers a smart lock starting>

< start="665.18" dur="3.72">at $99. Competitor Ring starts at $99.99.>

< start="668.96" dur="2.94">And Google's Nest Hello video doorbell starts at $229.>

< start="672.98" dur="4.32">The problem with that is you get a picture of the bad guy and you see the>

< start="677.3" dur="1.41">bad guy walk away with the package.>

< start="678.74" dur="1.68">But what are you going to do with the bad guy?>

< start="680.45" dur="3.99">Who's going to go after him and is anything really going to happen?>

< start="684.76" dur="1.86">And are you going to catch the guy who took your item?>

< start="686.96" dur="1.05">Typically not.>

< start="688.4" dur="1.77">Hey, put that down.>

< start="690.17" dur="2.25">Screenshots of package thieves from these doorbell cameras often end up>

< start="692.42" dur="3.21">posted online in forums like Nextdoor in hopes the community will>

< start="695.63" dur="1.56">recognize and stop the thieves.>

< start="697.82" dur="2.97">More and more, neighbors are taking matters into their own hands from>

< start="700.79" dur="4.05">baiting thieves with garbage-filled packages, boxes rigged to explode with>

< start="704.84" dur="3.6">blank shotgun shells, or the infamous glitter bomb packages planted by a>

< start="708.44" dur="1.14">former NASA engineer.>

< start="712.06" dur="4.29">We would want to encourage people not to take the law into their own hands>

< start="716.35" dur="4.68">and to go through the proper process of alerting police and not try to set>

< start="721.03" dur="2.55">anything up that could be potentially dangerous.>

< start="723.91" dur="3.15">Carriers and law enforcement recommend filing a police report when a>

< start="727.06" dur="4.44">package theft occurs. When you see the same body type and disguise>

< start="731.5" dur="4.44">happening repeatedly in a neighborhood and you're keeping that footage and>

< start="735.94" dur="3.15">you're sharing it with local law enforcement, there's a much better chance>

< start="739.09" dur="2.79">that you are going to catch someone.>

< start="742.03" dur="3.06">Still, even with a police report, the chances of catching them are slim.>

< start="745.48" dur="5.41">It's actually really quite difficult to find people who are doing this,>

< start="750.89" dur="3.08">really unless you're caught in the act.>

< start="754.21" dur="2.73">The Denver Police Department, one of the few that tracks package theft,>

< start="757.15" dur="2.96">says it arrested 7 % of package thieves in 2018.>

< start="760.45" dur="2.79">The U.S. Postal Inspection Service is your best bet.>

< start="763.36" dur="5.85">However, they were able to make arrests of less than 1 % of the number of>

< start="769.21" dur="2.52">packages that are being stolen per year.>

< start="772.21" dur="2.79">And that's just arrests. It's not convictions and it's not necessarily>

< start="775" dur="1.68">finding any of the lost loot.>

< start="776.83" dur="4.44">USPS says postal inspectors arrested almost 2,500 suspects for theft of>

< start="781.27" dur="1.72">mail and packages in 2018.>

< start="783.7" dur="3.33">The average value of a stolen package is far below what would constitute a>

< start="787.03" dur="3.36">felony. In California, for example, the item needs to be worth more than>

< start="790.46" dur="4.4">$950. But in South Carolina, a proposed Defense Against Porch Pirates Act>

< start="794.89" dur="3.63">would make it a felony. And in Texas, lawmakers recently passed a bill>

< start="798.52" dur="4.11">that would fine package thieves between $4,000 and $10,000 with a possible>

< start="802.63" dur="2.31">jail sentence between six months and 10 years.>

< start="805.36" dur="2.79">And some police departments have experimented with beating thieves with>

< start="808.15" dur="1.86">packages and staking out doorsteps.>

< start="811.29" dur="3.27">The reality is, as Amazon continues to bring more shoppers online, there>

< start="814.56" dur="2.79">are simply more opportunities for these easy, simple thefts.>

< start="817.65" dur="4.86">I think it's our job to continue innovating because there will be>

< start="822.57" dur="3.63">continued innovation on the criminal side as well.>

< start="826.62" dur="3.51">Amazon and other sellers are highly motivated to stop the huge losses>

< start="830.13" dur="3.27">incurred by package theft, which means the solutions are constantly>

< start="833.4" dur="3.75">improving from doorbell cameras, tracking and secure locations for package>

< start="837.15" dur="4.17">delivery. There will come a time when we look back at the way we handled>

< start="841.98" dur="4.23">e-commerce deliveries, and I think it'll probably seem fairly primitive>

< start="846.8" dur="3.22">that you just have these cardboard boxes sitting on porches.>

< start="850.65" dur="5.1">Whether it's things like the Amazon Key or lockboxes, technological>

< start="855.75" dur="5.55">innovation is so robust right now and especially if you combine that with>

< start="861.3" dur="3.84">an opportunity for individual entrepreneurs to make money from solving>

< start="865.14" dur="4.59">this problem, I really think that it will be figured out to some extent.>

< start="870.15" dur="3.75">I actually think it's probably gotten a little tougher for criminals to>

< start="873.9" dur="2.64">steal something because there's more attention paid to this, consumer>

< start="876.54" dur="2.79">awareness on it is growing, which our data reflects.>

< start="879.6" dur="2.49">But you're starting from a pretty easy position.>

< start="882.12" dur="1.56">This is not a difficult crime to commit.>