217s Prosecuting Estate Theft & Fraud images and subtitles

Litigated estate cases run hot. They're like hard-fought, name-calling politicalcampaigns. Allegations and counter- allegations abound. Much that is said inthe heat of the moment is later softened or withdrawn altogether. This is notabout the heat of the moment. It is not about estate differences, howevercantankerous, between personal administrators, executors, trustees, heirs,beneficiaries or estate creditors. It is about out-and-outtheft from an estate. We handle a good deal of estate litigation. I'm happy to reportthat estate embezzlement is rare, but disheartened to report that still exists.When estate theft is discovered, there is near universal surprise andconsternation: "How could this happen?"Well, it does happen. And here are a few examples. May 2015: a paralegal isarrested and jailed for stealing about $150,000 from an estate managed by herlaw firm employer. Part of the trust was established to provide for a special-needs child. September 2015: a woman is charged with trying to take her sister'sshare of their dead father's estate. The woman filed documents with the county,claiming that she was the sole heir to their father's estate. The woman ischarged with attempted theft by unlawful taking, tampering with public records,writing bad checks and false swearing. December 2015: a former city councilmanis sentenced to 25 years in prison for taking $50,000 from the trust fund of anelderly widow with dementia. The former councilman used the money to makepolitical donations in hopes of becominga power broker. April 2016: a suspended attorney is arrested on a charge of onecount of theft of $250,000 or more. The suspended attorney is charged with takingmore than $250,000 from an estate. If you believe that an estate in which you shouldhave an interest is the victim of embezzlement or theft, it is importantthat you contact local law enforcement with your concerns. It is up to lawenforcement to prosecute estate wrongdoers for estate criminal wrongdoing. Icaution that it is wrong for a victim to threaten criminal prosecution against awrongdoer unless the wrongdoer settles with the victim. Such threats canconstitute extortion. This is not something that you want to do. Leave it tolaw enforcement officials to prosecute liability for criminal conduct. Leave it tocivil lawyers to file civil lawsuits for recovery of damages stemming from thewrongdoing. Hackard Law is a civil law firm, and we litigate against estatewrongdoers for civil wrongs in the civil courts. If you would like to speak withan attorney at Hackard Law to address the civil recovery for estate wrongdoing, call usat 916-313-3030. Find us at Hackard Law, 10630 Mather Blvd.,Mather, CA 95655. Thank you.

Prosecuting Estate Theft & Fraud

Litigated estate cases run hot. They are like hard-fought, name-calling political campaigns. Allegations and counter-allegations abound. Much that is said in the heat of the moment is later softened or withdrawn altogether. This is not about the heat of the moment. It is not about estate differences, however cantankerous, between personal administrators, executors, trustees, heirs, beneficiaries or estate creditors. It is about out-and out-theft from an estate. At Hackard Law we handle a good deal of estate litigation. I’m happy to report that estate embezzlement is rare, though it’s sad but true that it still exists. When estate theft is discovered, there is near-universal surprise and consternation. How could this happen? Well, it does happen all too frequently – and here are a few examples: May 2015 A paralegal is arrested and jailed for stealing about $150,000 from an estate managed by her law firm employer. Part of the trust was established to provide for a special-needs child... To read more, visit: www.hackardlaw.com/blog/2016/05/criminal-prosecutions-for-crimes-against-estates.shtml
Estate Litigation, Estate Theft, Estate Embezzlement, Estate Fraud, Estate and Trust,
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< start="46.879" dur="5.5">that estate embezzlement is rare, but disheartened to report that still exists.>

< start="52.379" dur="4.93">When estate theft is discovered, there is near universal surprise and>

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< start="60.879" dur="7.181">Well, it does happen. And here are a few examples. May 2015: a paralegal is>

< start="68.06" dur="6.25">arrested and jailed for stealing about $150,000 from an estate managed by her>

< start="74.31" dur="5.309">law firm employer. Part of the trust was established to provide for a special->

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< start="92.189" dur="4.54">claiming that she was the sole heir to their father's estate. The woman is>

< start="96.729" dur="5.07">charged with attempted theft by unlawful taking, tampering with public records,>

< start="102.35" dur="6.78">writing bad checks and false swearing. December 2015: a former city councilman>

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< start="124.24" dur="7.89">a power broker. April 2016: a suspended attorney is arrested on a charge of one>

< start="132.13" dur="6.31">count of theft of $250,000 or more. The suspended attorney is charged with taking>

< start="138.44" dur="7.019">more than $250,000 from an estate. If you believe that an estate in which you should>

< start="145.459" dur="4.171">have an interest is the victim of embezzlement or theft, it is important>

< start="149.63" dur="4.55">that you contact local law enforcement with your concerns. It is up to law>

< start="154.18" dur="5.01">enforcement to prosecute estate wrongdoers for estate criminal wrongdoing. I>

< start="159.19" dur="5.78">caution that it is wrong for a victim to threaten criminal prosecution against a>

< start="164.97" dur="4.44">wrongdoer unless the wrongdoer settles with the victim. Such threats can>

< start="169.41" dur="5.799">constitute extortion. This is not something that you want to do. Leave it to>

< start="175.209" dur="4.771">law enforcement officials to prosecute liability for criminal conduct. Leave it to>

< start="179.98" dur="5.2">civil lawyers to file civil lawsuits for recovery of damages stemming from the>

< start="185.18" dur="6.32">wrongdoing. Hackard Law is a civil law firm, and we litigate against estate>

< start="191.5" dur="4.87">wrongdoers for civil wrongs in the civil courts. If you would like to speak with>

< start="196.37" dur="5.57">an attorney at Hackard Law to address the civil recovery for estate wrongdoing, call us>

< start="201.94" dur="8.85">at 916-313-3030. Find us at Hackard Law, 10630 Mather Blvd.,>

< start="210.79" dur="4.779">Mather, CA 95655. Thank you.>