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Today, we celebrate the great feast of St. Teresa of Ávila, one of the femaleDoctors of the Church. And certainly a mystical expert on the life of prayer.Her books: "Interior castle", "The Way of Perfection", her autobiography stand asspiritual classics for the soul that is seeking God, in how through a life ofever deepening prayer - leading into contemplation, a soul finds union withGod. Teresa lived at the time of the Golden Age in Spain and was living atthe same time as the Saint John of the Cross, who became her spiritual director -same time as Ignatius of Loyola. At the time, convent life was pretty loose andit was really more geared to women of the upper classes, whose parents were notable to find appropriate marriage partners for. So, some of them were justsent off to convents but they came with furniture and servants and all thecomforts of life. So, life in Teresa's Carmelite convent was not what we wouldimagine it to be - you know this life of prayer, silence,work, union with God. It was a lot of socializing, a lot of frivolous activitythat really had nothing to do with the original purpose. Teresa has thisprofound conversion. She passes this image of the Sacred Heart in thehallway of her convent, which she had passedprobably thousands of times before, but for some reason on that particular dayit struck her - the love of Jesus, but also the conviction that she was not livingthe life that the Lord wanted for her. So, she knelt down before that image and shesaid to Jesus, "Jesus I'm not leaving this spot until you give me the grace and theconviction to reform my life." She arose from that posture a different person. Anddedicated the rest of her life - to reforming her order, which was clearlynot well received. But she founded many convents of the new reformed order, the barefoot Carmelites ,who try to live the original austerity and purpose of the life. But she stands for us someone whoreally calls us to a deep life of prayer. And, if we can simply teach other peoplehow to pray, and to pray ourselves, perhaps that is the most transformativeevangelizing task that we can embrace. So, today on the feast day of Teresa ofÁvila, a spiritual giant, we asked her prayers, that that we too may be faithfulin prayer, that we too may ask the Lord to instill in our heart this greatdesire to be the person that God has called us to be.

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< start="2.09" dur="6.31">Today, we celebrate the great feast of St. Teresa of Ávila, one of the female>

< start="8.4" dur="5.01">Doctors of the Church. And certainly a mystical expert on the life of prayer.>

< start="13.41" dur="6.99">Her books: "Interior castle", "The Way of Perfection", her autobiography stand as>

< start="20.4" dur="6.09">spiritual classics for the soul that is seeking God, in how through a life of>

< start="26.49" dur="5.19">ever deepening prayer - leading into contemplation, a soul finds union with>

< start="31.68" dur="7.56">God. Teresa lived at the time of the Golden Age in Spain and was living at>

< start="39.24" dur="3.45">the same time as the Saint John of the Cross, who became her spiritual director ->

< start="42.69" dur="7.32">same time as Ignatius of Loyola. At the time, convent life was pretty loose and>

< start="50.01" dur="7.139">it was really more geared to women of the upper classes, whose parents were not>

< start="57.149" dur="4.261">able to find appropriate marriage partners for. So, some of them were just>

< start="61.41" dur="4.47">sent off to convents but they came with furniture and servants and all the>

< start="65.88" dur="5.55">comforts of life. So, life in Teresa's Carmelite convent was not what we would>

< start="71.43" dur="3.06">imagine it to be - you know this life of prayer, silence,>

< start="74.49" dur="5.7">work, union with God. It was a lot of socializing, a lot of frivolous activity>

< start="80.19" dur="4.89">that really had nothing to do with the original purpose. Teresa has this>

< start="85.08" dur="4.38">profound conversion. She passes this image of the Sacred Heart in the>

< start="89.46" dur="2.159">hallway of her convent, which she had passed>

< start="91.619" dur="4.29">probably thousands of times before, but for some reason on that particular day>

< start="95.909" dur="5.28">it struck her - the love of Jesus, but also the conviction that she was not living>

< start="101.189" dur="5.22">the life that the Lord wanted for her. So, she knelt down before that image and she>

< start="106.409" dur="5.431">said to Jesus, "Jesus I'm not leaving this spot until you give me the grace and the>

< start="111.84" dur="7.5">conviction to reform my life." She arose from that posture a different person. And>

< start="119.34" dur="3.9">dedicated the rest of her life - to reforming her order, which was clearly>

< start="123.24" dur="9.969">not well received. But she founded many convents of the new reformed order, the barefoot Carmelites ,>

< start="133.209" dur="7.501">who try to live the original austerity and purpose of the life. But she stands for us someone who>

< start="140.71" dur="7.71">really calls us to a deep life of prayer. And, if we can simply teach other people>

< start="148.42" dur="5.87">how to pray, and to pray ourselves, perhaps that is the most transformative>

< start="154.29" dur="6.79">evangelizing task that we can embrace. So, today on the feast day of Teresa of>

< start="161.08" dur="5.1">Ávila, a spiritual giant, we asked her prayers, that that we too may be faithful>

< start="166.18" dur="4.83">in prayer, that we too may ask the Lord to instill in our heart this great>

< start="171.01" dur="5.36">desire to be the person that God has called us to be.>