236s This French Woman Risked Her Life to Document Nazi Theft images and subtitles

- How you doing, man?You like the statue? Yeah, it's one of my favorites.It's called the Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin. You know that one of these original bronze sculpturesof Burghers of Calais was actually stolen by the Germansin World War II and then recovered?- No, I did not know that. - Yeah.Yeah.Have you ever heard of the Monuments Men? Yeah.XAVIER CARNEGIE: As World War II raged and the Nazis advancedacross Western Europe, Hitler's army caused untold destruction.At the same time, it oversaw the greatest art theft in history,systematically looting priceless works of art from Europe'soccupied territories.Alarmed by the plunder, the Alliescreated a special unit to safeguardEurope's historic treasures.The Monuments Men were on the front linesof cultural preservation in the midstof unimaginable destruction.We've invited Pruit, an art lover and history buff,to meet director Kate Haw.KATE HAW: Don't know if you've ever heard of Rose Valland.PRUIT ALLEN: Mm-mm.KATE HAW: Does she look like the hero of a spy story to you?PRUIT ALLEN: No.XAVIER CARNEGIE: Rose Valland worked at the Jeu de Paume.She was the only French citizen the Nazisallowed to stay at the museum during the occupation.They thought Valland was harmless,but little did they know.KATE HAW: She took copious notes and photographs,and recorded where all of the works of art were being hidden.She was very unassuming, and thatprobably worked in her favor.And they didn't know that she understood German.XAVIER CARNEGIE: Valland secretlytracked details regarding art shipmentsbeing sent to Nazi repositories in Germany. In August of 1944, an American soldiernamed James Rorimer came to Paristo help with the liberation of the city.XAVIER CARNEGIE: Second Lieutenant James Rorimerwas one of the Monuments Men tasked with findingEurope's stolen art.He met Rosa Valland at the Jeu de Paume Museumduring his search.Rorimer suspected Valland could lead the Alliesto the hidden works, but they both hadto learn to trust each other.KATE HAW: These are James Rorimer's memoirs.And in it, he recounts how long it tookto gain Rose Valland's trust.He knew that she had information thatwould be very valuable to the Monuments Menin recovering these works of art.XAVIER CARNEGIE: But he didn't know how valuable.Valland had risked everything to steal a crucial pieceof evidence from the personal scrapbookof a Nazi chief of staff.KATE HAW: She gave him this photo of Neuschwanstein Castle.She's written on the back of it, and it sayshere the deposits in Füssen.This is the town near the castle.So at that point, Rorimer knows he's got to get to this workas fast as he can.XAVIER CARNEGIE: When the Monuments Men reachedNeuschwanstein, they discovered over20,000 pieces of priceless art, jewelry,and furniture hidden inside.It took them months just to clear everything out.In 1945, Rose Valland joined the Monuments Menin Germany to help ensure the proper restitutionof the artwork.And although many artworks are still missing today,they eventually succeeded in returning more than 5 millionobjects to their rightful owners,thanks to the brave determination of Rose Vallandand others like her to defy the Nazi regimeand help save Europe's cultural heritage.

This French Woman Risked Her Life to Document Nazi Theft

During the Nazi occupation of France, many valuable works of art were stolen from the Jeu de Paume museum and relocated to Germany. One brave French woman kept detailed notes of the thefts. From the Series: Seriously Amazing Objects: Risk Takers bitly.com/2Uud44v
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< start="0" dur="1.17">- How you doing, man?>

< start="1.17" dur="0.8">You like the statue?>

< start="1.97" dur="1.21"> Yeah, it's one of my favorites.>

< start="3.18" dur="2.93">It's called the Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin.>

< start="6.11" dur="4"> You know that one of these original bronze sculptures>

< start="10.11" dur="3.39">of Burghers of Calais was actually stolen by the Germans>

< start="13.5" dur="1.29">in World War II and then recovered?>

< start="14.79" dur="1.6">- No, I did not know that. - Yeah.>

< start="16.39" dur="0.8">Yeah.>

< start="17.19" dur="1.44">Have you ever heard of the Monuments Men?>

< start="18.63" dur="1.32"> Yeah.>

< start="19.95" dur="2.64">XAVIER CARNEGIE: As World War II raged and the Nazis advanced>

< start="22.59" dur="6">across Western Europe, Hitler's army caused untold destruction.>

< start="28.59" dur="4.35">At the same time, it oversaw the greatest art theft in history,>

< start="32.94" dur="3.21">systematically looting priceless works of art from Europe's>

< start="36.15" dur="2.43">occupied territories.>

< start="38.58" dur="1.74">Alarmed by the plunder, the Allies>

< start="40.32" dur="1.92">created a special unit to safeguard>

< start="42.24" dur="2.58">Europe's historic treasures.>

< start="44.82" dur="2.7">The Monuments Men were on the front lines>

< start="47.52" dur="2.13">of cultural preservation in the midst>

< start="49.65" dur="2.308">of unimaginable destruction.>

< start="51.958" dur="2.692">>

< start="54.65" dur="3.78">We've invited Pruit, an art lover and history buff,>

< start="58.43" dur="3">to meet director Kate Haw.>

< start="61.43" dur="2.19">KATE HAW: Don't know if you've ever heard of Rose Valland.>

< start="63.62" dur="1.02">PRUIT ALLEN: Mm-mm.>

< start="64.64" dur="2.14">KATE HAW: Does she look like the hero of a spy story to you?>

< start="66.78" dur="1.266">PRUIT ALLEN: No.>

< start="68.046" dur="3.704">XAVIER CARNEGIE: Rose Valland worked at the Jeu de Paume.>

< start="71.75" dur="2.61">She was the only French citizen the Nazis>

< start="74.36" dur="3.75">allowed to stay at the museum during the occupation.>

< start="78.11" dur="2.31">They thought Valland was harmless,>

< start="80.42" dur="2.61">but little did they know.>

< start="83.03" dur="3.09">KATE HAW: She took copious notes and photographs,>

< start="86.12" dur="5.07">and recorded where all of the works of art were being hidden.>

< start="91.19" dur="2.94">She was very unassuming, and that>

< start="94.13" dur="2.1">probably worked in her favor.>

< start="96.23" dur="3.01">And they didn't know that she understood German.>

< start="99.24" dur="1.16">XAVIER CARNEGIE: Valland secretly>

< start="100.4" dur="2.46">tracked details regarding art shipments>

< start="102.86" dur="3.15">being sent to Nazi repositories in Germany.>

< start="106.01" dur="2.76"> In August of 1944, an American soldier>

< start="108.77" dur="1.98">named James Rorimer came to Paris>

< start="110.75" dur="2.41">to help with the liberation of the city.>

< start="113.16" dur="2.6">XAVIER CARNEGIE: Second Lieutenant James Rorimer>

< start="115.76" dur="2.91">was one of the Monuments Men tasked with finding>

< start="118.67" dur="1.71">Europe's stolen art.>

< start="120.38" dur="3.57">He met Rosa Valland at the Jeu de Paume Museum>

< start="123.95" dur="2">during his search.>

< start="125.95" dur="2.74">Rorimer suspected Valland could lead the Allies>

< start="128.69" dur="2.16">to the hidden works, but they both had>

< start="130.85" dur="2.8">to learn to trust each other.>

< start="133.65" dur="2.91">KATE HAW: These are James Rorimer's memoirs.>

< start="136.56" dur="3.21">And in it, he recounts how long it took>

< start="139.77" dur="2.25">to gain Rose Valland's trust.>

< start="142.02" dur="1.77">He knew that she had information that>

< start="143.79" dur="1.86">would be very valuable to the Monuments Men>

< start="145.65" dur="1.625">in recovering these works of art.>

< start="147.275" dur="2.905">XAVIER CARNEGIE: But he didn't know how valuable.>

< start="150.18" dur="3.33">Valland had risked everything to steal a crucial piece>

< start="153.51" dur="2.43">of evidence from the personal scrapbook>

< start="155.94" dur="3.64">of a Nazi chief of staff.>

< start="159.58" dur="3.98">KATE HAW: She gave him this photo of Neuschwanstein Castle.>

< start="163.56" dur="2.55">She's written on the back of it, and it says>

< start="166.11" dur="1.41">here the deposits in Füssen.>

< start="167.52" dur="2.28">This is the town near the castle.>

< start="169.8" dur="3.12">So at that point, Rorimer knows he's got to get to this work>

< start="172.92" dur="1.6">as fast as he can.>

< start="174.52" dur="1.91">XAVIER CARNEGIE: When the Monuments Men reached>

< start="176.43" dur="2.4">Neuschwanstein, they discovered over>

< start="178.83" dur="3.75">20,000 pieces of priceless art, jewelry,>

< start="182.58" dur="2.22">and furniture hidden inside.>

< start="184.8" dur="4.83">It took them months just to clear everything out.>

< start="189.63" dur="3.33">In 1945, Rose Valland joined the Monuments Men>

< start="192.96" dur="2.77">in Germany to help ensure the proper restitution>

< start="195.73" dur="0.8">of the artwork.>

< start="196.53" dur="2.85">>

< start="199.38" dur="3.48">And although many artworks are still missing today,>

< start="202.86" dur="3.42">they eventually succeeded in returning more than 5 million>

< start="206.28" dur="2.7">objects to their rightful owners,>

< start="208.98" dur="3.96">thanks to the brave determination of Rose Valland>

< start="212.94" dur="3.57">and others like her to defy the Nazi regime>

< start="216.51" dur="4.46">and help save Europe's cultural heritage.>