175s How pop culture shapes reality - and stereotypes images and subtitles

- We value a black presidentbut we don't value black people, right?We love black music but we don't love black people.We want to hear it but we don't want to fund the schoolsthat have the music programs that will laterturn into the next great musician.With white people, you see them all kinds of ways.They're heroes and they're villains.They're princesses and they're poor.Right, there's a range of that.When it comes to people of color in the media,we don't get that.Popular culture actually shapes how we understand reality.That's where black people and Muslims can challengewhat race means.I like to say that images of Muslims in the mediaare plentiful but monolithic.You have these two kind of ways people show upthey're always quote on quote originallyfrom someplace else and they're quote on quote brown.Which might mean South Asian or Arab or Middle Eastern.And that's true whether it's something negativeso your kind of like, you know, run of the mill terroristson nighttime TV or if it's something a little more complexlike Aziz Ansari's character on Master of None.The problem with these sort of characterizationsis that it continues the perpetuate this ideathat Muslims are in fact foreign.Which is a problem in America.And the reason why it's a problem in the United Statesis because the ways in which the country worksaround race and xenophobia is that your loyalty.You're only really loyal to the country if you're basicallywhite, male, Christian, have some money.When you see an image over and over and over again.So if you see a story about a black person as a criminal.Criminalization of black people is something that peoplethink is natural.It's because why?Because they've heard it from their politicians.They read it in their textbooks.And they seen it in their films and in their movies,in their novels, in their commercials.In the jingles, right?They seen it in so many different spacesso therefore then what happens is when they seea black person they make a series of assumptionsabout them before they even know who the person is.And so, when we don't have better representation,representations that are complicated,that give us the good, the bad, the ugly, the beautiful,the exciting, the boring, right.About different kinds of people,you want people who are complex because humans are complex.And so, popular culture can help by actually doing that.By giving us sort of complicated sort of narrativeseven if they're small, right, of who these people are.Representations don't have to be perfect, right.If you have a Muslim on a TV showthey don't have to be perfect.Because you don't want the opposite, right.So you have like a really bad personand then you have the good Muslimbut they're only good because they're not bad.What ends up happening is for the people who are depictedin really sort of stereotypical ways they experiencesort of erasure.So they're supposed to be a part of the community.They're supposed to be a part of societybut they don't feel like it because they're not reflected.And when you're not reflected it's also tell you in a sensethat you're not of value.

How pop culture shapes reality - and stereotypes

Roseanne Barr’s racist tweets weren’t her first, and they likely won’t be the last we see in movies and TV shows. Here’s why that’s a problem.
islam, stereotypes, culture, Media, representation, black women,
< ?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?><>

< start="0.15" dur="1.98">- We value a black president>

< start="2.13" dur="2.378">but we don't value black people, right?>

< start="4.508" dur="4.152">We love black music but we don't love black people.>

< start="8.66" dur="2.73">We want to hear it but we don't want to fund the schools>

< start="11.39" dur="2.52">that have the music programs that will later>

< start="13.91" dur="2.95">turn into the next great musician.>

< start="16.86" dur="2.71">With white people, you see them all kinds of ways.>

< start="19.57" dur="1.48">They're heroes and they're villains.>

< start="21.05" dur="1.45">They're princesses and they're poor.>

< start="22.5" dur="1.267">Right, there's a range of that.>

< start="23.767" dur="2.833">When it comes to people of color in the media,>

< start="26.6" dur="1.16">we don't get that.>

< start="27.76" dur="3.51">Popular culture actually shapes how we understand reality.>

< start="31.27" dur="3.23">That's where black people and Muslims can challenge>

< start="34.5" dur="1.11">what race means.>

< start="35.61" dur="3.09">I like to say that images of Muslims in the media>

< start="38.7" dur="1.951">are plentiful but monolithic.>

< start="40.651" dur="2.869">You have these two kind of ways people show up>

< start="43.52" dur="2.09">they're always quote on quote originally>

< start="45.61" dur="3.25">from someplace else and they're quote on quote brown.>

< start="48.86" dur="3.31">Which might mean South Asian or Arab or Middle Eastern.>

< start="52.17" dur="2.87">And that's true whether it's something negative>

< start="55.04" dur="2.44">so your kind of like, you know, run of the mill terrorists>

< start="57.48" dur="3.652">on nighttime TV or if it's something a little more complex>

< start="61.132" dur="3.073">like Aziz Ansari's character on Master of None.>

< start="64.205" dur="3.355">The problem with these sort of characterizations>

< start="67.56" dur="2.84">is that it continues the perpetuate this idea>

< start="70.4" dur="1.872">that Muslims are in fact foreign.>

< start="72.272" dur="1.798">Which is a problem in America.>

< start="74.07" dur="1.78">And the reason why it's a problem in the United States>

< start="75.85" dur="2.69">is because the ways in which the country works>

< start="78.54" dur="2.68">around race and xenophobia is that your loyalty.>

< start="81.22" dur="2.372">You're only really loyal to the country if you're basically>

< start="83.592" dur="3.088">white, male, Christian, have some money.>

< start="86.68" dur="3.07">When you see an image over and over and over again.>

< start="89.75" dur="3.53">So if you see a story about a black person as a criminal.>

< start="93.28" dur="2.735">Criminalization of black people is something that people>

< start="96.015" dur="1.235">think is natural.>

< start="97.25" dur="0.833">It's because why?>

< start="98.083" dur="2.49">Because they've heard it from their politicians.>

< start="100.573" dur="2.207">They read it in their textbooks.>

< start="102.78" dur="2.38">And they seen it in their films and in their movies,>

< start="105.16" dur="1.747">in their novels, in their commercials.>

< start="106.907" dur="1.603">In the jingles, right?>

< start="108.51" dur="2.17">They seen it in so many different spaces>

< start="110.68" dur="2.48">so therefore then what happens is when they see>

< start="113.16" dur="2.11">a black person they make a series of assumptions>

< start="115.27" dur="2.337">about them before they even know who the person is.>

< start="117.607" dur="2.823">And so, when we don't have better representation,>

< start="120.43" dur="1.409">representations that are complicated,>

< start="121.839" dur="2.872">that give us the good, the bad, the ugly, the beautiful,>

< start="124.711" dur="2.404">the exciting, the boring, right.>

< start="127.115" dur="2.166">About different kinds of people,>

< start="129.281" dur="2.728">you want people who are complex because humans are complex.>

< start="132.009" dur="4.011">And so, popular culture can help by actually doing that.>

< start="136.02" dur="3.553">By giving us sort of complicated sort of narratives>

< start="139.573" dur="3.127">even if they're small, right, of who these people are.>

< start="142.7" dur="1.976">Representations don't have to be perfect, right.>

< start="144.676" dur="1.674">If you have a Muslim on a TV show>

< start="146.35" dur="1.2">they don't have to be perfect.>

< start="147.55" dur="1.3">Because you don't want the opposite, right.>

< start="148.85" dur="1.548">So you have like a really bad person>

< start="150.398" dur="1.602">and then you have the good Muslim>

< start="152" dur="1.44">but they're only good because they're not bad.>

< start="153.44" dur="2.54">What ends up happening is for the people who are depicted>

< start="155.98" dur="2.31">in really sort of stereotypical ways they experience>

< start="158.29" dur="1.794">sort of erasure.>

< start="160.084" dur="2.156">So they're supposed to be a part of the community.>

< start="162.24" dur="1.642">They're supposed to be a part of society>

< start="163.882" dur="3.09">but they don't feel like it because they're not reflected.>

< start="166.972" dur="2.971">And when you're not reflected it's also tell you in a sense>

< start="169.943" dur="1.25">that you're not of value.>