494s Eidos-Montréal - Our New Studio images and subtitles

Back when we started in 2007, there were two of us.We had to assemble a team, figure out our first project, create a structure, learn.Around 100 Eidossians joined us each year,so our growth rate was impressive.We delivered 9 games in 12 years.Nowadays, we are a team of roughly 500 Eidossians. Our growth is more controlled now,but we’re still a pretty impressive, sizeable studio.We realised that, in the first 10 years, we had built the studioby adding to it based on the requirements at the time.However, this couldn’t work in the long term,so we decided that the time had come to rethink our model.We set up a work committee which established a process to select a group of architects.The committee’s initial instinct was to involve groups of architectsused to working on commercial projects.Their designs were too impersonal.Besides, we knew we didn’t want stepping into Eidos to feel likeentering an insurance broker’s or a bank.That’s not what we do.We wanted to feel at home.Which is why we decided to go against conventionsand involve a partner who specialized in residential buildings.And then it hit me, I remembered things I had read about, the work done by La Shed,whose approach to materials strongly appealed to me,with their cosy yet minimalist feel.As we had never had any similar projects before, we weren’t constrained by any models.We created one from scratch.The briefing was straightforward: once the elevator doors open, you're home.The smells, the textures, the imagery, the warmth...You’re home, plain and simple!We translated this into something closer to the idea of a village.We approached Eidos as a community, a small town,a group of houses which created this community.There are 500 of us Eidossians working in the same place, spread out on two floors.It may sound easy but it isn’t.So we needed ways to show that there are two floors in the studio,to inject some transparency, to encourage socializing, etc.We created these two huge openings in the slab.The minute the lift opens, we can see the size of the office,spread on two levels, with this platform rising to the upper floor.And then there’s the core of the project.The gathering space at the heart of the studio.Everything converges towards this gathering place.The idea behind the ceiling is that we have a triangular metallic framemade of laser cut parts which are bent and interlockedlike pieces of a puzzle.We then inserted triangular extrusions made of foam of various thicknesses.The thickest foam represents the gathering places.We inserted triangular lights that create a track throughout the studios,indicating the direction of traffic, in the spots where the foam is thickest.We organised the studio around a rather organic plan.This band of light at the heart of the gathering places where the foam is thickestgives structure to the layout.We didn’t want this white office to look clinical,and the contrast of wood against the white walls and ceilingsallowed us to create a warm, welcoming space.For this reason, we opted for a rustic grade white oak woodwith knots and some colour variation.We wanted to express the function of each space through its materials,so we have meeting rooms with glass walls, reminiscent of tatami roomswith rice paper sliding walls.The toilets and the kitchen sport glass tile mosaics,while all the sound studios are wallpapered in felt, which is also a natural fibremade from wool.It’s all a nod to Japanese architecture, really.When the time came to choose furniture, we immediatelyasked Eidos whether they wanted to design part of it.This also allowed us to work with local craftspeople in Montreal.For instance, we worked on the meeting room tables with Kastella,and with Mobilier de Gaspé on the low,triangular coffee table sets.We collaborated with cabinetmaker Marfoglia to create all the built-in elements:the kitchen, bookshelves, backboards...We don’t just do video games at Eidos-Montréal, we all have hobbies and things we’re passionate about.As it happens, my friend Martin, one of our artistic directors, is also a skilled woodworker.“Martin, can you take care of the signs in the studio?”He agreed, of course.Our image is often expressed though the games and the products we release,but we’re going beyond this with this new studio, we’re transcending our industry.We project an image that will reach other sectors.The way we conceived this studio in terms of functionalitywill create amazing sharing, exchanging and communication opportunities,in line with Eidos’ vision for the future.Redesigning the studio wasn’t just about image.We needed to acquire new skills in order to rise to the studio’s ambitions:artificial intelligence, machine learning, data analysis and data science.The new observation room includes innovations such as screen-based eye tracking,and video analysis of the players’ emotions.We have expanded our motion capture room.We added a photogrammetry room.It’s a system of synchronised cameras which allows us to scan the actorsfor better precision and image quality, but we can also scan emotions,so it takes the studio to yet another level in terms of expertise and quality.It was vital for us that all Eidossianshave a sense of well-being,that they feel at home in the studio.We had never received so many family visit requestsfrom Eidossians wanting to show their family where they work.Sitting down and making plans is one thing, looking aheadand considering the process is another...We were lucky enough to have Square Enix’s support to achieve this.They completely understood why we were doing this and where it would lead us.We’re only seeing the beginning of the potential of this new studio, this new philosophy.We’re really excited about the future.

Eidos-Montréal - Our New Studio

Subtitles are available - make sure to activate them! Take a look at our brand new, amazing home, and its creation! This renovated studio is all about fostering our teams' well-being and creativity to create memorable games. We're excited for what the future holds #CraftingEmotions
tomb raider, deus ex, square enix, montreal, game development, game dev, eidos montreal,
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< start="1.58" dur="2.679">Back when we started in 2007, there were two of us.>

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< start="14" dur="3.14">Around 100 Eidossians joined us each year,>

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< start="37.22" dur="3.24">We realised that, in the first 10 years, we had built the studio>

< start="40.46" dur="2.76">by adding to it based on the requirements at the time.>

< start="43.7" dur="3.14">However, this couldn’t work in the long term,>

< start="47.9" dur="2.72">so we decided that the time had come to rethink our model.>

< start="53.22" dur="7.04">We set up a work committee which established a process to select a group of architects.>

< start="60.68" dur="4.559">The committee’s initial instinct was to involve groups of architects>

< start="65.24" dur="2.32">used to working on commercial projects.>

< start="68.76" dur="1.1">Their designs were too impersonal.>

< start="70.28" dur="3.12">Besides, we knew we didn’t want stepping into Eidos to feel like>

< start="73.4" dur="2.66">entering an insurance broker’s or a bank.>

< start="76.06" dur="1.439">That’s not what we do.>

< start="77.499" dur="2.351">We wanted to feel at home.>

< start="79.85" dur="3.93">Which is why we decided to go against conventions>

< start="83.78" dur="3.259">and involve a partner who specialized in residential buildings.>

< start="87.4" dur="5.22">And then it hit me, I remembered things I had read about, the work done by La Shed,>

< start="92.62" dur="4.1">whose approach to materials strongly appealed to me,>

< start="96.72" dur="3.06">with their cosy yet minimalist feel.>

< start="100.66" dur="5.36">As we had never had any similar projects before, we weren’t constrained by any models.>

< start="106.18" dur="2.6">We created one from scratch.>

< start="108.78" dur="4.94">The briefing was straightforward: once the elevator doors open, you're home.>

< start="114.58" dur="4.64">The smells, the textures, the imagery, the warmth...>

< start="119.22" dur="2.64">You’re home, plain and simple!>

< start="124.16" dur="2.9">We translated this into something closer to the idea of a village.>

< start="127.06" dur="6.06">We approached Eidos as a community, a small town,>

< start="133.74" dur="4">a group of houses which created this community.>

< start="139.58" dur="4.96">There are 500 of us Eidossians working in the same place, spread out on two floors.>

< start="144.55" dur="2.249">It may sound easy but it isn’t.>

< start="146.799" dur="4.131">So we needed ways to show that there are two floors in the studio,>

< start="150.93" dur="4.71">to inject some transparency, to encourage socializing, etc.>

< start="157.88" dur="2.96">We created these two huge openings in the slab.>

< start="162.46" dur="3.839">The minute the lift opens, we can see the size of the office,>

< start="166.3" dur="3.999">spread on two levels, with this platform rising to the upper floor.>

< start="170.7" dur="2.78">And then there’s the core of the project.>

< start="176.16" dur="2.86">The gathering space at the heart of the studio.>

< start="180.12" dur="5.84">Everything converges towards this gathering place.>

< start="191.3" dur="4.42">The idea behind the ceiling is that we have a triangular metallic frame>

< start="195.72" dur="4.499">made of laser cut parts which are bent and interlocked>

< start="200.22" dur="3.18">like pieces of a puzzle.>

< start="206.06" dur="5.54">We then inserted triangular extrusions made of foam of various thicknesses.>

< start="212.58" dur="3.04">The thickest foam represents the gathering places.>

< start="216.18" dur="7.42">We inserted triangular lights that create a track throughout the studios,>

< start="223.6" dur="4.78">indicating the direction of traffic, in the spots where the foam is thickest.>

< start="229.42" dur="5">We organised the studio around a rather organic plan.>

< start="235.32" dur="6.479">This band of light at the heart of the gathering places where the foam is thickest>

< start="241.8" dur="3.68">gives structure to the layout.>

< start="250.7" dur="4.14">We didn’t want this white office to look clinical,>

< start="255.2" dur="3.02">and the contrast of wood against the white walls and ceilings>

< start="258.22" dur="3.46">allowed us to create a warm, welcoming space.>

< start="262.32" dur="3.68">For this reason, we opted for a rustic grade white oak wood>

< start="266" dur="2.67">with knots and some colour variation.>

< start="269.8" dur="4.48">We wanted to express the function of each space through its materials,>

< start="274.9" dur="3.85">so we have meeting rooms with glass walls, reminiscent of tatami rooms>

< start="278.75" dur="2.01">with rice paper sliding walls.>

< start="281.5" dur="3.26">The toilets and the kitchen sport glass tile mosaics,>

< start="285.14" dur="6.04">while all the sound studios are wallpapered in felt, which is also a natural fibre>

< start="291.18" dur="0.86">made from wool.>

< start="293.26" dur="3.26">It’s all a nod to Japanese architecture, really.>

< start="300.8" dur="2.72">When the time came to choose furniture, we immediately>

< start="303.521" dur="4.699">asked Eidos whether they wanted to design part of it.>

< start="308.22" dur="3.68">This also allowed us to work with local craftspeople in Montreal.>

< start="313.96" dur="4.16">For instance, we worked on the meeting room tables with Kastella,>

< start="320.8" dur="4.18">and with Mobilier de Gaspé on the low,>

< start="324.98" dur="1.84">triangular coffee table sets.>

< start="330.38" dur="4.9">We collaborated with cabinetmaker Marfoglia to create all the built-in elements:>

< start="336.6" dur="3.52">the kitchen, bookshelves, backboards...>

< start="341.2" dur="4.48">We don’t just do video games at Eidos-Montréal, we all have hobbies and things we’re passionate about.>

< start="346.08" dur="4.94">As it happens, my friend Martin, one of our artistic directors, is also a skilled woodworker.>

< start="351.26" dur="2.58">“Martin, can you take care of the signs in the studio?”>

< start="353.84" dur="1.52">He agreed, of course.>

< start="358.12" dur="3.32">Our image is often expressed though the games and the products we release,>

< start="361.449" dur="5.161">but we’re going beyond this with this new studio, we’re transcending our industry.>

< start="366.61" dur="3.77">We project an image that will reach other sectors.>

< start="380.14" dur="4.68">The way we conceived this studio in terms of functionality>

< start="384.82" dur="5.4">will create amazing sharing, exchanging and communication opportunities,>

< start="391.2" dur="4.2">in line with Eidos’ vision for the future.>

< start="397.74" dur="4.22">Redesigning the studio wasn’t just about image.>

< start="402.96" dur="5.48">We needed to acquire new skills in order to rise to the studio’s ambitions:>

< start="409.12" dur="5.5">artificial intelligence, machine learning, data analysis and data science.>

< start="414.74" dur="5.16">The new observation room includes innovations such as screen-based eye tracking,>

< start="419.9" dur="2.489">and video analysis of the players’ emotions.>

< start="422.389" dur="3.831">We have expanded our motion capture room.>

< start="426.52" dur="2.376">We added a photogrammetry room.>

< start="428.896" dur="4.493">It’s a system of synchronised cameras which allows us to scan the actors>

< start="433.389" dur="3.901">for better precision and image quality, but we can also scan emotions,>

< start="437.29" dur="3.61">so it takes the studio to yet another level in terms of expertise and quality.>

< start="446.78" dur="5.36">It was vital for us that all Eidossians>

< start="452.15" dur="1.71">have a sense of well-being,>

< start="453.86" dur="3.12">that they feel at home in the studio.>

< start="457.669" dur="3.011">We had never received so many family visit requests>

< start="460.68" dur="2.36">from Eidossians wanting to show their family where they work.>

< start="465.08" dur="4.06">Sitting down and making plans is one thing, looking ahead>

< start="469.14" dur="1.76">and considering the process is another...>

< start="470.9" dur="3.639">We were lucky enough to have Square Enix’s support to achieve this.>

< start="475.76" dur="3.08">They completely understood why we were doing this and where it would lead us.>

< start="480.28" dur="5.64">We’re only seeing the beginning of the potential of this new studio, this new philosophy.>

< start="486.06" dur="1.5">We’re really excited about the future.>